Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, & Math (STEAM)

Technology Integration in Teacher Education at the University of Utah

 

The infographic presents the varied and meaningful ways the University of Utah trains teachers to integrate technology into instruction.  The infographic covers mobile devices for content creation, cloud computing, teaching with multimedia, digital assessments, internet safety, professional learning networks, and digital presence.

To download this infographic in PDF, please click here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Support and Mentoring in an Alternate Route to Teaching (SMART)

2011-12-smart

The UEPC conducted an evaluation of the University of Utah Support and Mentoring in an Alternate Route to Teaching (SMART) program, which was funded by the National Science Foundation, in its first two years of implementation.

The 2011-12 evaluation report highlighted key findings in the program areas of recruitment and selection of participants, coursework, the role of mentors, cohort support, and professional development.

To download this report in PDF, please click here. 

 

 

Initiative to bring Science Programs to the Incarcerated (INSPIRE)

The UEPC served as the external evaluator for the  INSPIRE project run by the University of Utah Center for Science and Mathematics Education (CSME), in partnership with the Salt Lake County Metro Jail and the Utah Department of Corrections.

  • The purpose of the evaluation is to document the impact of the project on offenders, corrections staff, and scientists, including:
    • Offender participation in, and evaluation of, science lectures and projects.
    • Offender knowledge, self-concepts, and career interests in STEM.
    • Perceived accessibility and utility value of STEM.
    • Perceived value of conservation, ecology, and nature.
    • Increased feelings of community within the prison, and within the larger community.
    • Corrections staff perceived accessibility and utility value of STEM.
    • Scientists increased opportunities and attitudes toward public dissemination of research, especially to underserved populations.

Contact us to learn more about this work.

 

Math for America

mfa-evaluation-2014The UEPC served as the external evaluator for the University of Utah Math for America (MfA) program, which received funding from the National Science Foundation Robert Noyce Teaching Scholarship Program, the Math for America Foundation, and the State of Utah.

The purpose of this evaluation was to determine the impact of MfA program support and participation on the Fellows’ preparedness and effectiveness as math teachers. The report addresses questions:

  • In what ways has the ongoing engagement with the MfA program supported MfA Fellows in their first years of teaching?
  • What school conditions contributed to or hindered MfA fellows’ effectiveness in their first years of teaching?
  • To what extent are MfA fellows prepared to be effective secondary math teachers?

To download this report in PDF, please click here.

 

Precalculus to Calculus Delay

This study used a sample of 1,185 Utah students to examine the relationship of elapsed time between Precalculus and Calculus on Calculus grades.

  • Results indicated that waiting longer to take Calculus after Precalculus was related to higher Calculus grades.
  • This finding could not be explained by the relationship of elapsed time to any of 15 other student variables.

Full Study PDF
To download this report in PDF, please click here.

Brief PDF
To download this report in PDF, please click here.

 

Math 1050: Utah’s College Algebra

The UEPC analyzed data from the Utah Data Alliance to identify a group of 3,033 students who enrolled in College Algebra (Math 1050) at public higher education institutions in Utah. The study analyzed the factors that predicted success in Math 1050.

  • Findings of this study indicated that students enrolled in Math 1050 for the first time were 3.3 times more likely than their peers to earn credit, students with a high school GPA of 3.5 or higher were 3.2 times more likely to earn credit, and students enrolled through concurrent/dual enrollment were 3.1 times more likely to earn credit.

To download this report in PDF, please click here.

 

Concurrent Enrollment and the STEM Pipeline

As a follow up to our Math 1050: College Algebra study, the UEPC analyzed data from the Utah Data Alliance to compare math outcomes for 593 students who took Math 1050 and Math 1060 (Precalculus) through concurrent enrollment while in high school to math outcomes for 592 students who took Math 1050 and Math 1060 through regular enrollment while in college. This analysis found:

  • Precalculus enrollment type (concurrent enrollment or college enrollment) did not predict different rates of repeating Precalculus classes after passing the courses.
  • Precalculus enrollment type (concurrent enrollment or college enrollment) did not predict Calculus grades after students were equated on math performance prior to their Precalculus classes.

To download this report in PDF, please click here.

Have Questions?

We would be happy to answer any questions you might have.