Postsecondary Policy

Chronic Absenteeism

The UEPC conducted analyses of the demographic and academic correlates of chronic absenteeism in K-12.

  • A student was considered chronically absent if he or she missed school 10 percent of the time, or more, for any reason.
  • Findings presented in the brief showed that:
    • Homelessness and mobility were the strongest demographic predictors of chronic absenteeism.
    • Chronic absenteeism was negatively correlated with student performance including reading on grade level, CRT scores, grades, and likelihood of graduating.
    • The negative effects of chronic absenteeism were cumulative.
  • Cross-sectional and longitudinal methods were used in this study.

To download this report in PDF, please click here.

 

Math 1050: Utah’s College Algebra

The UEPC analyzed data from the Utah Data Alliance to identify a group of 3,033 students who enrolled in College Algebra (Math 1050) at public higher education institutions in Utah. The study analyzed factors that predicted success in Math 1050.

  • Findings of this study indicated that students enrolled in Math 1050 for the first time were 3.3 times more likely than their peers to earn credit.
  • Students with a high school GPA of 3.5 or higher were 3.2 times more likely to earn credit.
  • Students enrolled through concurrent/dual enrollment were 3.1 times more likely to earn credit.

To download this report in PDF, please click here.

 

Concurrent Enrollment and the STEM Pipeline

As a follow up to our Math 1050: College Algebra study, the UEPC analyzed data from the Utah Data Alliance to compare math outcomes for 593 students who took Math 1050 and Math 1060 (Precalculus) through concurrent enrollment while in high school to math outcomes for 592 students who took Math 1050 and Math 1060 through regular enrollment while in college. This analysis found:

  • Precalculus enrollment type (concurrent enrollment or college enrollment) did not predict different rates of repeating Precalculus classes after passing the courses.
  • Precalculus enrollment type did not predict Calculus grades after students were equated on math performance prior to their Precalculus classes.

To download this report in PDF, please click here.

 

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